Wonderfully readable text on philosophy. The author sets himself a major task: to explain briefly and clearly but not superficially some of the ideas of several prominent names in the history of western philosophy. . This book serves its purpose of summarizing the history of philosophy following the history of philosophers in an accessible language. A Little History of Philosophy offers a friendly overview of some big ideas in Western philosophy, and I'd love to read his take on some of the great Eastern philosophers' lives and ideas. I bought this for my 12 yr old daughter for xmas after she had expressed an interest in reading about philosophy. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in, Best introductory book for Western philosophy, Reviewed in the United States on July 26, 2016. From Socrates through to Alan Turing and Peter Singer, bitesize chapters relate the history of philosophy from its birth to present day. . The idea that braininess is sexy may provide comfort to philosophers, but their own subject refutes the delusion. It's enough if he gets the reader to look in more depth at original sources and learned commentary on these. Philosophy summarized in coloquial language, Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2016. Often after listening to each chapter (yes, I've "read" the audiobook version) I was much more curious about the work of the philosopher than what 9 or 10 minutes of narration was capable of covering. He LOVED this book - I'm telling you he RAVED about it (he reads quite a bit). Nevertheless, such rows about who's in and who's out are inevitable and what matters most is that Warburton includes all the figures whose place in the canon is secure. He is excited to get others in this series that cover topics of history/etc. It may be true of all subjects, but it’s particularly true of philosophy that it’s hard to understand any of it until you know quite a lot about it. But with its complete absence of condescension, the book is bound to find a readership among older teenagers and adults who still don't have that many options open to them if they want a readable and wide-ranging introduction to philosophy. Philosophers. The narratives are fun and memorable, and really help frame philosophy not as an abstract academic subject but more as a practical effort by real human beings to make sense of the big questions we all wrestle with in life. In a book this short with so many authors covered, one cannot expect too much. It is clear and uncomplicated to read and provides the background before one wants to tackle a more comprehensive work in philosophy (eg. A Little History of Philosophy by Nigel Warburton. Nevertheless, it… The aim of his "little history" is to lift the veil of abstraction and convolution that is so often the besetting flaw of philosophy… Warburton (Philosophy Bites) provides a history of the major philosophers of … A Little History of Philosophy is focused on that audience and on anyone else who knows little about philosophy except that it is, as Warburton says, "impenetrable and obscure." In A Little History of Philosophy British philosopher Nigel Warburton summarizes, quite succinctly, the history of Western Philosophy. “A Little History of Philosophy” by Nigel Warburton ISBN: 9780300187793 Does what it says on the tin. 7 … I. To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. The series has had more than 11 million downloads to date and Warburton's related Twitter feed was recently ranked by PeerIndex as more influential than those of Evan Davis, Katie Price and Kevin Pietersen. Warburton's latest is one of those books for children that adults will probably read more. Helpful. More recently, Warburton has taken this no-nonsense approach into new media with his philosophy bites podcast series, made with David Edmonds. Very easy to read, and this covers quite a bit while managing to include a few people who are often unfortunately left out--especially Schopenhauer. Julian Baggini's latest book is The Ego Trick: What Does it Mean to be You? I read just the first chapter myself and throughout it was quite well done. It’s literally like a timeline! Independent culture newsletter The best in film, music, TV & radio straight to your inbox every week. A must read for any person or community. It is a "little" history in that it greatly reduces the enquiry of some of the greatest philosophers who ever lived, but I guess it's only meant to whet your appetite for more. In this way, you can easily grasp their ideas. Over nearly two decades his Philosophy: The Basics has sold in excess of 100,000 copies, with no gimmicks, no literary flourishes, just admirable clarity, concision and accuracy. But he does identify least some of the important ideas of the ones he selects. Reviewed in the United States on June 30, 2017. I"ll try to remember to post an update when she picks it up. Philosophy—History. You couldn’t call it a full history, since it focuses primarily on Western philosophy. Both contain 40 short chapters arranged in more or less chronological order. For readers of E. H. Gombrich's A Little History of the World, an equally irresistible volume that brings history's greatest philosophers to life "A primer in human existence: philosophy has rarely seemed so lucid, so important, so worth doing and so easy to enter into. A readable if unremarkable addition to the increasingly crowded shelves of philosophy primers. 2. Reading Nigel Warburton’s A Little History of Philosophy makes me appreciate even more (if that is possible) EH Gombrich’s A Little History of the World. paper) 1. Warburton packs a heck of a lot in to what is something of a Goldilocks volume: neither too much nor too little, the exegesis neither too thin or too thick and lumpy, his Little History can be consumed as a nourishing treat in its own right or provide the perfect fuel to kick-start anyone's journey into philosophy. A Little History of Philosophy by Nigel Warburton – review Nigel Warburton's elementary guide to philosophers strikes the right balance for smart children and curious adults alike Julian Baggini It's a very simple format: each episode of around 15 minutes is a short interview with a philosopher. . I love this book. And I think many readers will do just that. A readable if unremarkable addition to the increasingly crowded shelves of philosophy primers. I love how each chapter is started off with some sort of story and then gets into the philosophers thinking and most pivotal moments and then it flows right along into the next philosopher and their thinking. Science has all the good pictures, history the best stories and all philosophy is left with is books, blokes and the odd pile of bricks. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 I'm not sure yet if it will click for my 12 yr old. Unlike, say, Sophie’s World, written 20 years earlier by Jostein Gaarder – in which Sophie, the 12 year old protagonist, struggles to answer the philosophical questions posed to her by a mysterious letter-writer – A Little History of Philosophy tells rather than asks the reader, leading her by the hand through a philosophical labyrinth in which she is never allowed to lose (or find) her way. For this, F. Copleston is better. For readers of E. H. Gombrich's A Little History of the World, an equally irresistible volume that brings history's greatest philosophers to lifePhilosophy begins with questions about the nature of reality and how we should live. It is in chronological order, starting with the ancient Greeks and moving through to the twentieth century. Some will no doubt find the selection reflects parochial tastes a little too much. This book is one of the single greatest reads ever in the sense that it points you to a number of great books (I myself have downloaded at least 20 of the aforementioned books) and that it really shows you how to think and impacts the way you look at the world it also showed me as the religious person I am that philosophy is not always anti-Semitic but in this case provided me with many cases for my religion that I would have never thought about or of. Nigel Warburton understands this more than most and while he lacks the media profile of Alain de Botton, over the years he has quietly become quite one of the most-read popular philosophers of our time. he idea that braininess is sexy may provide comfort to philosophers, but their own subject refutes the delusion. It's modelled on EH Gombrich's 1935 A Little History of the World, which was published in English for the first time only six years ago by the same publisher. There are a number of philosophers and concepts that I have previously read about, some several times, and this book definitely did the best job of providing clear concise explanations of complex thinkers/ideas. (Granta), Nigel Warburton's elementary guide to philosophers strikes the right balance for smart children and curious adults alike. Each chapter ends by making a link, however tenuous, to the next thinker, by means of contrast ("Scientists use real experiments; philosophers, on the other hand, tend to use thought experiments") or similarity ("The political philosopher John Rawls also used a thought experiment").