It is widespread in eastern and south-western Australia, ranging from Cooktown to eastern South Australia and in the southern corner of Western Australia. It has a red bill with a yellow tip and a red facial shield. [Narrabri Lake, NSW, September 2010], Lateral view of a swimming Dusky Moorhen (photo courtesy of Field Guide to the Birds of Australia. The eye is bright yellow. they prefer the dry season, from January to April. an old reed stump. Please note that while models can be very informative, they are only a representation of the real world and thus should always be viewed with caution. of the respective owners. often in tall reeds. [Narrabri Lake, NSW, September 2010], Direct size comparison between a Dusky Moorhen, left, and an Home > Field Guide App > Animals > Species list > Dusky Moorhen. We give no guarantee rainfalls they can disperse along the rivers leading into the Hatchling also black with red frontal shield, juvenile has green legs, green horn or black coloured bill, generally paler. It is not often seen as it spends most of the time in dense vegetation near water. Juvenile Dusky Moorhen demonstrating that they can walk on lilypads The structure of these bird pages is explained HERE. Black-tailed Native-hen (Tribonyx ventralis) is a large, stout, dark, fleet-footed rail with an erect narrow black tail which is held folded. [Near Dubbo, NSW, October 2016], Lateral view of a Dusky Moorhen Dusky Moorhen compiled distribution map - BirdLife International. comments and suggestions for improvement are welcome. (photo courtesy of J. Ross-Taylor) Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) is larger with a bright purple front and all red bill and shield. they can become used to the presence of humans. Not the photos you want? [Narrabri Lake, NSW, September 2010], Lateral view of a swimming Dusky Moorhen Frontal view of a Dusky Moorhen; the prominent shield indicates However, in parks are more grey than black and have no facial shield or red on It has brown back and wings and grey throat and chest with rusty tan coloured rear and under the tail. plumage, with Have a After substantial Murray-Darling Basin and the Great Dividing Range. (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor) Dusky Moorhen - The State of Victoria, Department of Environment and Primary Industries/McCann | Dusky Moorhen - Michael Seyfort. undertail. The contrasting black tail is long and narrow and is flattened along the mid-line of the bird . The range of the Dusky Moorhen encompasses eastern Indonesia, of WA, most of the NT and the western half of SA. Simpson K, Day N & Trusler P 2004. [Narrabri Lake, NSW, December 2010], Dorsal view of a Dusky Moorhen regularly by us on fresh water in to Australia. at Narrabri Lake, Narrabri, NSW. reported to us from the ACT and VIC. [Near Dubbo, NSW, October 2016], Close-up lateral view of a Dusky Moorhen (photo courtesy of A. Dusky Moorhens on Cape York peninsula either. were accompanied by three adults during a foraging array (photo courtesy of C. Hayne) You can read more about the science behind these models here. For more salient facts on any bird species out from the far south-western tip of the continent to populate the look here . . Copyright © 2020 ClimateWatch All rights reserved. worse, caught by the photographer... The difference between a Dusky Moorhen and a Australian (Purple) Swamphen is that coverts have two white sides. Nests They are found in wetland habitats, including swamps, creeks, rivers and lagoon estuaries. We have found them in many different kind of freshwater habitats Earthwatch acknowledges the generous support of the Australian Government for funding provided by way of a Citizen Science Grant through Inspiring Australia - Science Engagement Program. Dusky Moorhen inspecting a stick mound for its suitability for Tasmanian Native Hen (Tribonyx mortierii)is a large, heavy bodied, flightless bird found only in Tasmania. in reeds along up-to-date. Dusky Moorhens feed on a variety of (mostly aquatic) plants and Dusky Moorhen urban parks: Dusky slow-flowing creeks. dangle conspicuously under the tail. Male The Viking, Camberwell, Victoria. that this is a male, Close-up frontal portrait of a female Dusky Moorhen wings and rump having a slight brown tinge. The bill and frontal shield is green, with an orange-red lower mandible ('jaw'). the bill yet. inland NSW, e.g. This is why they have a preference for The undertail aquatic habitats with tall reeds: They use those reeds Bush-hen (Amaurornis moluccana) belongs to the same family as crakes and rails. are not always well-hidden. The dusky moorhen are widespread in eastern and south-western Australia, and has recently established in Tasmania. latitude), Dusky Moorhens can breed any time of the year. top of a low, flat object, such as e.g. [Narrabri Lake, NSW, October 2016]. in the foreground an Eurasian nesting Disclaimer: Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra) is recognised by its snowy white bill and forehead shield. Ross-Taylor) The Tasmanian Native-hen has a large yellow bill, a red eye, brown head, back and wings and is slate grey on its underparts. the former has two white spots, while the latter has only one on its first time in May 2006 in a park in Sydney, NSW. The nest can be floating on water, affixed to a plant, or sit on They are also widespread in Indonesia, Borneo, Sulawesi and New Guinea. Dusky Moorhens, nominate race "tenebrosa", are endemic ephemeral wetlands, HERE Dusky Moorhen (size: 35 - 40 cm) by G. Miles, Dusky Moorhen compiled distribution map -. NEW to ClimateWatch? [Narrabri Lake, NSW, August 2010], Close-up near-dorsal view of a Dusky Moorhen (photo courtesy of T. All photos and information >> Spotless Crake Zapornia tabuensis. contributors. [Narrabri Lake, NSW, November 2014], Adult Dusky Moorhen with four juveniles; in total, six juveniles They are also common in urban parks. [Near Dubbo, NSW, October 2016], Example of the dangers of humans leaving behind rubbish in ponds in Legs and feet are bright pink. Non-breeding vagrant. Dusky Moorhen, back right, feeding on parts of underwater plants; They are seen in pairs, parties and sometimes large groups. in inland NSW/QLD and along the coastline. The map on the right shows how the range of the species might change between now and 2070, with orange areas indicating where the species might disappear, green areas where the species range might expand, and blue areas where the habitat is predicted to be suitable for the species now and in the future. the Gascoyne. There are no Black-tailed Native-hen (Tribonyx ventralis) is a large, stout, dark, fleet-footed rail with an erect narrow black tail which is held folded. Dusky Moorhen, back right, feeding on parts of underwater plants; in the foreground an Eurasian Coot (photo courtesy of J. Ross-Taylor) [Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, June 2014] Dusky Moorhen picking water bugs off … It is a good swimmer and also wades in shallow water. A bulky shallow nest is built in rushes or reeds or on floating platforms in open water. ranging from olive to scarlet and yellowish-orange. [Lake Clarendon, Gatton, QLD, January 2018], Lateral view of a juvenile Dusky Moorhen continent, including northern Tasmania, plus the south-western corner [Narrabri Lake, NSW, March 2011], Near-frontal view of a juvenile Dusky Moorhen The facial shield Juvenile birds are similar to adults but duller. The bird is mainly brownish-grey, with white spots on the flanks. after a dive and a Cattle Egret watching proceedings The bird is mainly brownish-grey, with white spots on the flanks. Gallinula tenebrosa. Coot (photo courtesy of J. Ross-Taylor) The legs are powerful and grey in colour. In WA they can spread The models for this species were run in the Biodiversity and Climate Change Virtual Laboratory. [Mudgee, NSW, December 2015], Close-up frontal portrait of a Dusky Moorhen